This episode looks back at recent Careers of the Future interviews to summarize key insights for how students can prepare for the Future of Work.
With their hunched posture and baldheads, vultures are associated with death. But they are the unsung cleanup crew in Africa. Without them, diseases would spread, and the Maasai Mara Reserve with a smell like a slaughterhouse. But in the last 30 years, even African vulture species have declined by over 80%. Pastoralists angered by attacks on their cattle by lions lace the carcasses with poison. 60 % of vulture deaths have been due to poisoning. Follow a team trying to save them during the annual wildebeest migrations. A film by Noella Luka and Mercy Adundo.
In 1970 Kenya was home to 20,000 black rhinos. By 1989 only 400 rhinos were left. They were killed for their horns which are prized in Asia for folk medicine. Even though there is no scientific proof that the raw material of both rhino horns and human fingernails has any medicinal value, a kilo of keratin fetches $60K on the black market. Conservationists say that the only way to save rhinos from extinction is to create a secure habitat for them to live and breed. Ol Pejeta Conservancy, which started with only 4 black rhinos in 1988 now is home to 114. Each of Ol Pejeta's rhinos is protected by rangers and armed guards at a cost of $10K a year. But this expense is part of a comprehensive business plan where wildlife protection has to pay its own way. A film by Teeku Patel & Amit Ramrakha.
Imagine treating a 200-pound gorilla that’s broken her leg after falling out of a tree. That’s a routine call for Rwanda’s Dr. Gaspard and Gorilla doctors working in Volcanoes National Park. On other days he will treat gorillas hurt by snares, poachers, or in fights between rival groups. We’ll go on patrol with the park rangers responsible for keeping this highly endangered species and our close cousin, from disappearing forever. A film by Novella Nikwigiza & Lucas Rosenberg.
Interested in a career in architecture or design? In this episode, Moyez Alwani (Global Head of Design at The Aga Khan Academies) shares his journey and discusses the skills necessary to succeed in these fields.
Nairobi’s building boom has created an environmental catastrophe in Kenya’s semi-arid eastern provinces. You can’t make cement without sand, often illegally scooped out of riverbeds by an army of workers in Machakos and Makueni countries. After the sand has been carted away by unscrupulous sand harvesting cartels, the rivers dry up or turn into raging torrents during the rainy season. Makueni’s governor is trying to stop it but compares the business to the drug trade, where corruption and threats of violence stymie enforcement. A film by Samuel Waweru & Humphrey Odhiambo.
Kenya experienced one of the worst droughts in memory because critics say, it has cut down its trees. Forests used to cover 30% of the land In pre-colonial times. Now they only occupy 6% of Kenya’s space. Helen and Kenya Mutiso want to teach Kenyans how to grow forests in their own backyard and make money from medicines, skincare products, and dyes. It’s part of a nationwide effort to cover 10% of Kenya’s land with trees. A film by Kevin Njue.
External stressors and interactions have real physical consequences on the human body. Join us as we explore mental health, especially in these tough times.
Kakamega is Kenya’s only tropical rain forest and home to 480 species of birds. But this biological treasure house is under threat from an exploding local population. Ernest Musotso has fathered 30 children and like his neighbors, he’s been nibbling land at the edge of the forest. But even Ernest understands that old customs will have to change if the forest is to survive. Kakamega’s rainmakers and forest guides are trying to save the last stand of ancient indigenous trees, and make sure the beautiful birds who live there, don’t go silent. A film by Robert Gichira and Namukabo Werungah co-produced with NTV Kenya.
Anyone can immerse themselves in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math. Join us as we discover STEM through the eyes of trailblazers in the field, no matter how young.
Looking at each individual family member’s physical and psychological well-being as well as the quality of relationships between each family member is important in understanding how to promote happiness within a family unit.
This is the final in the series of the UK Thinking Ahead talks, which is on Ageing Gracefully. Listen to Professor Lynda Gratton and Faiz Mitha’s very interesting discussion on how, when, and why to start preparing in today's climate, as we are living and working for longer. Lynda is a Professor of Management Practice at London Business School where she directs ‘Human Resource Strategy in Transforming Companies’, considered the world’s leading program on human resources. Faiz Mitha is a Busines Manager for Deutsche bank and an Australian ex-pat, who migrated to the UK in 2009. He is also the Board member for AKYSB.
The Art of Being Smart is one of a kind high-performance coaching program created for high school and post-secondary students. The unique concepts that you are about to learn are personally taught by Aleem Nasser (MBA) - the president and founder of The Art of Being Smart. Aleem is an author, university instructor, international speaker, and entrepreneur who has taught his "equation for success" to over 4000 individuals worldwide and has consulted with many global institutions.
Elephants, the largest land animals, are majestic creatures. Many farmers in Kenya see them as lumbering pests. Human-wildlife conflict is becoming a bigger threat to elephants than poaching. Amboseli National Park is home to more than 1600 elephants. But the park can only sustain several hundred elephants. The rest migrate through private conservancies, community grazing land, and the expanding commercial farms springing up along a new highway linking Kenya and Tanzania. Unfortunately, many elephants forage for food while trampling farmers’ tomato and cornfields. As the elephants ply their ancient migratory routes, conflict is inevitable. After an elephant killed a Maasai herder at a watering hole for cattle, his friends speared five pachyderms in revenge. Kenya’s wildlife vets had to scramble to patch up the victims. A film by Sheila Sendeyo & Robert Gichira co-produced with NTV Kenya.
Chemistry is more than just atoms and molecules. Join us as we explore the applications of chemistry in our lives and on earth.
The Art of Being Smart is one of a kind high-performance coaching program created for high school and post-secondary students. The unique concepts that you are about to learn are personally taught by Aleem Nasser (MBA) - the president and founder of The Art of Being Smart. Aleem is an author, university instructor, international speaker, and entrepreneur who has taught his "equation for success" to over 4000 individuals worldwide and has consulted with many global institutions.
Education is key to improving the quality of life. In this 1987 documentary, we look at how the AKES makes education more accessible and available, from its establishment in Imam Sultan Mahomed Shah's time until the 1980s.
Take a trip down memory lane with ECDC Tanzania and Zambia through a collection of videos and photos of at-home learning sessions during the pandemic with the support of parents, as well as physically-distanced in-person sessions.
AKEB Uganda: Parenting Matters Teens, Educationist, Parenting Counselor, and Motivational Speaker by Aneela Altaf Mukhi.

Showing 43–63 of 144 results